| 01250 872 261

Roofshield

Roofshield is a unique, three - layer, nonwoven, spunbonded, polypropylene breather membrane with a patented melt - blown core. It is intended for use as a pitched roof underlay (breathable roofing felt) and is fixed beneath tiles and slates.

Roofshield provides a secondary barrier to the ingress of rain, wind and snow. It has a low vapour resistance and is air - permeable; additionally, it eliminates the incidence of interstitial condensation in pitched roofs. 

The product provides the most cost - effective solution to controlling interstitial condensation in a pitched roof.

  • Water Resistant
  • Low Vapour Resistance
  • Air Permeable
  • No vapour control layer required.
  • UV Resistant
  • Hydrophobically treated.
  • Supplied in 1m x 50m rolls.
  • Eliminates low & high level ventilation.

Literature Download

Roofshield-Literature-360x313

BBA Certification

BBALogo-360x317-2

NBS Plus & BIM

NBS-Logos-360x317

CAD Details

Cold-Roof-Tile-Detail-360x317

UK Availability

RSM-Map-360x317

Worldwide Availability

worldmap360x317

  Roofshield - Covering All The Bases

As an effective method of addressing condensation in roofs that needs no ventilation or tapes, the Roofshield air and vapour permeable membrane from the A.Proctor Group presents a compelling case.

Vapour permeable membranes have been gaining favour in recent years for preventing condensation in cold pitched roof applications, providing a combination of water resistance and a high degree of breathability, alleviating the need for traditional eaves and ridge ventilation. This ability of the A. Proctor Group’s vapour permeable membrane product Roofshield was recognised by the NHBC in 2011 following an amendment to their Technical Standards resulting from complaints of condensation occurring in some non-ventilated roofs. This change required ridge ventilation to be installed in all cold roof constructions where a vapour permeable underlay was used. The Partners in Innovation (PiI) study, carried out in 2004, showed that a vapour and air permeable underlay, Roofshield, could be used to prevent condensation without the need for additional ventilation.

Read Full Article

As an effective method of addressing condensation in roofs that needs no ventilation or tapes, the Roofshield air and vapour permeable membrane from the A.Proctor Group presents a compelling case.

Vapour permeable membranes have been gaining favour in recent years for preventing condensation in cold pitched roof applications, providing a combination of water resistance and a high degree of breathability, alleviating the need for traditional eaves and ridge ventilation. This ability of the A. Proctor Group’s vapour permeable membrane product Roofshield was recognised by the NHBC in 2011 following an amendment to their Technical Standards resulting from complaints of condensation occurring in some non-ventilated roofs. This change required ridge ventilation to be installed in all cold roof constructions where a vapour permeable underlay was used. The Partners in Innovation (PiI) study, carried out in 2004, showed that a vapour and air permeable underlay, Roofshield, could be used to prevent condensation without the need for additional ventilation.

The potential cost savings on a construction project of being able to install an effective membrane without the need for ventilation, despite the high quality nature of the Roofshield membrane itself, have been shown in a 2014 report undertaken by property consultants Hardies. More recently, the the case for Roofshield has been further bolstered with amendments to official guidance on roof construction due to its ability to resist wind uplift without requiring tape, as is detailed below.

Background

Roofshield was developed 20 years ago in response to problems caused by the double-whammy of the UK’s fondness for cold pitched roof construction, and increasing thermal performance requirements which led to a tendency to place additional insulation above the ceiling joists leading to an increased risk of condensation in the roof space. With vapour condensing on the cold surfaces in the roof, particularly in winter months, a variety of efforts were made across the industry to develop membranes which would allow the vapour to escape. These breathable membranes were designed to be installed over the rafters as the roof underlay as an alternative to traditional 1F felt.

The majority of those membranes were vapour permeable but air tight, rather like a Gore-Tex jacket. While water resistant, offering additional benefits during construction similarly to Roofshield, they did not completely prevent condensation within the roof space, meaning some low and/or high level ventilation had to be introduced in order to allow air to circulate and fix this problem.

Therefore two types of technological solutions have been presented to specifiers; vapour permeable but air tight solutions, based on film laminated polypropylene technology which has been favoured by several manufacturers, or the vapour and air permeable version alleviating the need for ventilation, such as Roofshield. A debate continues to run in the industry around whether roofs fitted with the air tight membranes will still require ventilating due to their being vapour permeable, although testing undertaken within the 2004 Partners in Innovation study confirmed this was the case. The continued discussion has however led to a recommendation for a vapour control layer to be considered at ceiling level to reduce the moisture load into the roof space when film based laminates are used as the underlay.

Iain Fairnington, Technical Director of the A. Proctor Group, explains the building physics around why air tight membranes’ limited vapour permeability means that condensation can still occur: “If you have a big cold roof space, and you have a sudden drop in temperature, you want to have air movement. People assumed that because they were installing a vapour permeable membrane you didn’t need to ventilate your roof, but in certain circumstances moisture levels were too high or temperatures too cold to allow the vapour to permeate without condensing.”

By contrast, Roofshield has a far higher degree of vapour permeability, as well as air permeability, so will still perform in conditions in which air tight alternatives will not. The 2004 study was conducted on a cross-industry basis with Glasgow Caledonian University because there was a view that a consensus was desirable on whether it was necessary to ventilate buildings using vapour permeable membranes. It had the result of “dispelling a lot of theories around ventilation” says Iain Fairnington.

In fact the study contained the crucial finding that when a roof was unventilated, and used an air and vapour permeable underlay, such as Roofshield, this would further reduce and inhibit the formation of condensation on the underlay. This contributed to the NHBC making a statement in their Technical Extra bulletin Issue 6 that independently certified air and vapour permeable underlays, such as Roofshield, could be used without additional ridge ventilation in cold roofs. This has seen a groundswell of interest in the product recently, aided by its hydrophobic and UV resistant qualities. Another key benefit for installers is that the product is manufactured in lightweight 1 m wide rolls, the same size as traditional IF felt underlay, and can therefore be fixed and laid on open rafters in the same way, reducing health and safety risks of overreaching with wider membranes on open rafters.

Meeting the new Code of Practice on wind uplift

While there has been widespread acceptance of the abilities of air permeable membranes to offer a range of benefits for contractors and developers, the 2014 revision of BS 5534 Slating and tiling for pitched roofs and vertical cladding - Code of Practice caused a stir in the world of roof construction and again put the spotlight on their differences. This was particularly with regard to the technical specification of underlays, in particular lightweight membranes, and how they behave under wind.

The revision of the standard includes a number of recommendations which affect the way all slated and tiled roofs will be constructed in future. Advice contained in Annex A has been introduced to avoid incorrect specification which has been perceived, in extreme cases, to potentially lead to underlays being lifted by wind, ballooning and dislodging slates or tiles. The annex includes a new wind uplift resistance test and classification system for underlays in relation to the batten gauge being used and the location of the particular project. It requires manufacturers to provide a Zonal Classification label to enable specifiers to easily identify a suitable underlay.

The change has led to some membranes manufacturers introducing tapes, or integral adhesive strips, which will enable them to be used, sealed at the overlaps. However as Iain Fairnington, who sat on the standards committee, explains, this was not an requirement for Roofshield being a heavier membrane, a factor which has been welcomed by installers: “I was told by the roofing industry that they do not want tapes, they may work well in a lab, but out on site, the situation with wind, dirt and dust does not lend itself to tapes.”

The A. Proctor Group has undertaken independent, third party testing, in accordance with Annex A, to establish that Roofshield is fully compliant and are providing specifications to interested parties on that basis. This enables Roofshield to be used in three of the five specified zones with no additional requirements such as time-intensive taping, and in all zones if an 11mm counter batten or 38mm tiling batten is used.

This new requirement for compliance with wind uplift issues brings the conclusions of the Partners in Innovation research back into the foreground again, as the findings were based on roofs with open overlaps (ie not taped). In that study, even in the case of air tight membranes there was a degree of vapour escape. Now however, if laps must be taped, that mechanism for escape has gone. Iain concludes: “While there does not seem to be much appetite to confront this issue, there is a very real risk that we will see moisture occurring again in such specifications.”

The recent Code of Practice revision, plus the previous statements from the NHBC and the PiI Research, adds up to a compelling case for air and vapour permeable membranes as a robust and installer-friendly solution for healthier buildings. In the case of Roofshield the manufacturer is able to make a credible case that the product will comply with all standards and avoid the need for additional measures such as ventilation and tapes. Before the PiI study and research into implications of omitting ventilation, there had been a lot of resistance to change in the industry; however specifiers now have more and more reasons to believe that Roofshield offers the simple answers.

Recent Projects

Wraptite Tape - Chester le Street School

 

 

Project: Chester le Street School
Product: Wraptite Tape
Location: Durham

 

Reflectatherm Plus Muscat Airport

 

Project: Muscat Airport
Product: Reflectatherm Plus
Location: Oman

 

Wraptite-SA Historic Church Tokyo

 

 

 

Project: Historic Church
Product: WraptiteSA
Location: Tokyo

 

Related Products

Roofshield

Roofshield-930x550

Roofing breather membrane with superior air & vapour permeability. BBA Certified for non-ventilated warm & cold roofs.

Wraptite-SA

Wraptite-SA-930x550

Unique self-adhesive vapour permeable external airtight barrier. Labour saving & robust performance combined.

Reflectashield TF

ReflectashieldTF-930x550

Class leading reflective breather membrane with an R-Value of 0.81 m2K/W. Reduces insulation requirements in walls.

FAQ's

  • Is Roofshield suitable for use without any (high or low level) ventilation?

    Yes. Roofshield does not require any ventilation at either high or low level.

    Is Roofshield suitable for use with sarking boards?

    Yes. The Roofshield BBA certificates cover Roofshield for use with softwood sarking, plywood or OSB in warm roof constructions, and softwood sarking in cold roof constructions.

    How long has Roofshield been available for?

    Roofshield has been on the market for over 18 years.

    My building control officer needs a 'Condensation Risk Analysis' - can you help?

    Yes, we provide this free of charge. Please contact us for assistance.

    My building control officer needs a 'U-value' calculation - can you help?

    Yes, we provide this free of charge. Please contact us for assistance.

    Is Roofshield suitable for non-ventilated use in NHBC projects?

    Yes, as Roofshield is air-permeable as well as vapour permeable, it meets NHBC regulations without the needs for vents or a VCL.

    Do I need to use a VCL with Roofshield?

    No. A VCL is not required when using Roofshield.

    Is Roofshield BBA Certified?

    Yes. Roofshield has been BBA certified since 1996. It carries both warm & cold pitched certification for use in non-ventilated roofs.

Invalid email address

Contact Us

  8:30am - 5pm, Mon - Fri

  01250 872 261

  01250 872 727

  

  A. Proctor Group Ltd., The Haugh, Blairgowrie, PH10 7ER

 

Testimonials

  • "The A Proctor Group Ltd.'s high quality Vapour Control Layers have now become our products of choice. They have been used in various projects including Portlaoise Education Campus, Newry Leisure Centre and Pallas Foods, Dublin. They also offer a very high level of customer service, prompt deliveries and are always at the end of the phone which is sometimes invaluable in times of need."

    James Wyse - U-Value Insulation

  • "We have traded together for many years and our partnership is stronger than ever due to the quality, range and versatility of products supplied. The technical knowledge, customer service and support we receive is exceptional"

    Paul Mullan - Charles Tennant

  • "Proctors have supplied Avonside Supplies for many years with the highest quality of acoustic and thermal materials and provided us with technical assistance whenever it was requested. We have always received a first class service from the Proctor’s team and would have no hesitation giving our recommendation."

    Keith Williams - Avonside Supplies

  • "Arabian Profiles have used Profoil Vapour Barrier on numerous projects in the Middle East. Despite the distance from the UK to the Middle East the service from Proctors has always ensured that the product arrives in a timely manner."

    John McWilliams - Arabian Profile

  • "The Hemsec Group of companies are continually striving to find a condensation controlled membrane that will exceed our expectations. We realise the importance of such a membrane in the construction of all our SIP structures and chose the A. Proctor Frameshield plus 150 product for all of its benefits and the excellent product support from A. Proctor Ltd."

    James Glover - Hemsec Installations Ltd.

  • "The A Proctor Group Ltd provide Eurban Ltd with quality breathable membranes for a number of commercial, education and private building projects. We have found their technical expertise and customer service to be superb."

    Melissa Doughty - Eurban Ltd.

  • "We have found their sales team to be very efficient, and highly reliable in terms of deliveries and order support. The products which Proctors offer are unique, and meet our customers demands in terms of superior performance and value."

    Martin Parry - Lawsons Eco Centre

  • "A Proctor consistently deliver quality products at cost effective prices which in turn gives our customers excellent value for money. Their customer service and reputation is second to none."

    Gethin Williams - EuroClad Ltd

  • "The A Proctor Group Ltd has been supplying CGL with quality insulation products for over 20 years now. As well as providing the insulation they have provided technical know-how and assistance on the insulation as well as condensation risk analysis for the product build up. The whole team are professional and reliable and its great to know that when we pick up the phone we know whatever we need is at the other end."

    Brian McIntyre - CGL Facades

  • "By working with the A Proctor Group, we supply quality products to site, within the timescales our customers require. The Proctor Group continue to portray total professionalism in all aspects of trading between our two companies."

    Mike Roberts - Blinking Lamp Company

  • "Ease of ordering, technical support, ease of installation, no roof ventilation required in most circumstances, high strength of the material resists damage through foot traffic, no wind generated noise & the peace of mind knowing that we are not likely to get complaints of condensation problems from our customers."

    Chris Watts - RB Watts Ltd

  • "We, at Bovis Homes, specify Roofshield on all of our developments as we believe it presents a cost effective solution and ensures our roof spaces are adequately ventilated but without the introduction of cold air through conventional soffit ventilation"

    Michael Black - Bovis Homes

  • "The sales team at Proctor's are very knowledgeable and helpful with every enquiry. All deliveries arrive exactly when they say. The quality of the cladding products is second to none and we have successfully supplied several very hi-specification jobs. We have no hesitation in recommending Proctor's products to our customers."

    Ken McLelland - Ken's Yard

  • "As a roofing contractor specialising in the larger, more prestigious, type of project, we prefer to use only the highest quality products. Therefore we use Proctor Roofshield wherever possible; we have been using it for over 15 years, together with their condensation risk analyses and U-value calculations."

    Mike Camilleri - Camilleri Roofing

  • "Our measured days saved, based on our previous Clair TAR where fabrication and shaping of Aerogel was carried out off shore shows 13 days saving overall. This time saved was a direct result of supplying a pre-cut/preformed vessel insulation of Aerogel Insulation for bends, tees, dome ends and vessel bodies."

    Alan Stephens - Cape Aberdeen

APG-LOGO

 

Innovative Construction Products for Over 80 Years.